War conditions in Ukraine become a breeding ground for infectious disease outbreaks

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As Ukrainians flee their country of From Russia military attack, they face the prospect of the invisible enemy: bacteria and viruses that take advantage of the crowded conditions caused by the bloody invasionaccording to the Washington Post.

Ukrainians huddle under a destroyed bridge as they try to flee across the Irpin River on the outskirts of Kiev, Ukraine, Saturday, March 5, 2022.
(Associated Press)

“As we’ve seen in wars over the years, viruses and bacteria are happy to exploit those situations where humans are under pressure,” said Máire Connolly, a professor at the National University of Ireland Galway who studies the relationship between war and disease. .

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“These factors increase the risk of outbreaks among a population that is already dealing with the trauma of forced displacement.”

As the Russian offensive cuts off travel, hospitals in Ukraine are running out of vital medical supplies. Health workers are moving their patients into makeshift shelters as civilian casualties mount under the threat of an explosion at any moment, according to the news outlet.

“What we are dealing with now in Ukraine is a double crisis,” Connolly added, also noting that wartime conditions are fodder not only for COVID-19, but also for the polio outbreak in Ukraine, which experts international organizations have been trying to put an end to. months.

She describes the often paradoxical situation of refugees fleeing to safety only to end up in unsanitary and often unsafe conditions that are the perfect settings for an outbreak of infectious diseases, such as a resurgence of tuberculosis, the document added.

Children have taken refuge underground in Ukraine amid Russian invasion

Children have taken refuge underground in Ukraine amid Russian invasion

Ukraine suffered some of the worst COVID-19 rates in the world, as neighboring European countries enjoyed some of the lowest vaccination rates in Europe, creating the threat of a COVID-19 surge as thousands, potentially millions , of Ukrainians seek refuge in neighboring countries, because of the charge.

“I am heartbroken and deeply concerned for the health of the people in Ukraine in the escalation of the crisis,” Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, said in a recent statement.

Posted a video on Twitter of newborns in Ukraine in a makeshift bomb shelter that he called “beyond heartbreaking.”

Last Sunday he warned that the country is running nearly empty of oxygen supplies as US officials accuse the Russian military of Shooting in ambulances and hospitals.

“Most hospitals could run out of oxygen in the next 24 hours. Some have already been depleted,” the WHO added.

Compounding the situation, experts warn that the conflict may also have disturbed sensitive radioactive waste stored at the Chernobyl nuclear plant that could lead to another environmental disaster, according to the Post.

Surveillance footage shows a flare landing at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant.

Surveillance footage shows a flare landing at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant.
(Zaporizhzhya NPP via YouTube/via REUTERS)

However, the newspaper added humanitarian Organizations are coming together to provide emergency support, with the WHO providing $3.5 million in additional emergency funding, the US Agency for International Development deploying a disaster response team to Poland, and, together with the Department of State, is providing nearly $54 million in additional assistance.

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The White House has also requested $6.4 billion in emergency aid, with most of it going to humanitarian aid, according to the Post.

“It is understandable that Covid is not the most important thing for anyone [during war conditions]Rachel Silverman, a policy fellow at the Center for Global Development, texted the Post from Germany.

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“Our priorities have shifted towards trauma care, ensuring access to services, continuity of care, mental health and psychosocial support,” said Jarno Habicht, WHO Representative in Ukraine.

People who wish to donate can visit www.ukraine.who.foundation.





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